Former Governors

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Mr. Latibeaudiere was born on June 9,1951. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree in Economics and Mathematics in 1974, and a Masters in Economics in 1975, both from the University of the West Indies. Mr. Latibeaudiere has also participated in a number of advanced courses in central banking studies and in management, at the IMF Institute, the Federal Reserve Bank in New York, the Bank for International Settlements in Switzerland and at Oxford University.

A career central banker, Mr. Latibeaudiere joined the staff of the Bank of Jamaica in 1975. Between 1979 and 1983, he was seconded to the Caribbean Development Bank (CDB) in Barbados as a Country Economist where he developed a sound knowledge of the economies of the English-speaking Caribbean countries. He returned to the Bank of Jamaica in 1983 and worked in various positions until 1988 when he was appointed Deputy Governor. He became Senior Deputy Governor in 1995, and in 1996 was appointed Governor and Supervisor of Banks. In 2000, he was appointed Chairman of the newly established Financial Regulatory Council, the body responsible for coordinating the regulation of the overall financial system.

In 1997 Mr. Latibeaudiere was awarded the Carlton Alexander Award for Excellence by his alma mater, Jamaica College, and on August 6, 2002 he received the country's fourth highest national award, the Order of Jamaica, for his services to central banking and finance.























Jacques Bussières was born in Quebec City, Canada on 25 September 1937. He earned a B. A. from Jesuits College in Quebec in 1957 and a B. Commerce from Laval University, Quebec in 1959. The following year he earned his Masters in Commerce, also from Laval University. Between 1961 and 1963, he pursued postgraduate studies at the London School of Economics and went to Harvard University from 1979 to 1980.

A career central banker, Mr. Bussières joined the staff of the Bank of Canada on graduating from university and worked in several areas of the Bank. In 1974, he was appointed Advisor on Domestic Affairs and in 1980, Advisor on International Affairs.

In 1990, he was appointed Governor of the Bank of Zambia, which position he held until June 1992. Mr. Bussières served as Advisor to the Governor of the Bank of Jamaica from 1992 to 1993 before being appointed Governor in 1993. He served until 1996.

Roderick Rainford served as Governor of the Bank from October 1992 to June 1993. Prior to joining the Bank, Mr. Rainford worked with the Jamaican government, and then served as Secretary General of the Caribbean Community (Caricom), a position he held from 1980 to1992.

Mr. Rainford, who was born on 07April, 1940, holds a B.Sc. in Economics from the University of the West Indies. In 1963, he went to Oxford University as a Rhodes Scholar, earning a B.A. Jurisprudence in 1965, and a Diploma in Economic Development in 1966. He was a Woodrow Wilson Fellow in 1971 and in that year, gained his Masters of Arts in International Relations from the University of Toronto.

Roderick Rainford has received several honours including the Cacique Crown of Honour from Guyana in 1989 and the Order of Jamaica in 1992.

Since leaving the Bank of Jamaica, Mr. Rainford has worked in the Office of the Executive Director of the International Monetary fund (IMF) with responsibility for the Caribbean and currently works with the Inter-American Development Bank in Washington.

G. Arthur Brown was the first Jamaican to be appointed Governor of the Bank of Jamaica. Born in St. Elizabeth, Jamaica on 25 July 1922, Mr. Brown began his career in the Jamaican civil service in 1941when he joined the staff of the Income Tax Department. He remained there until 1947 when he was awarded the Issa Scholarship to the London School of Economics from which he graduated in 1950 with a B. Sc. in Economics.

On his return to Jamaica, Mr. Brown worked briefly with the Income Tax Department before being assigned to the Colonial Secretary's Office in 1951 where he stayed until 1953 when he was appointed Principal Assistant Secretary in the |Ministry of Finance.

In 1957, Mr. Brown became the first Jamaican head of the Central Planning Unit and was responsible for drafting Jamaica's first Five Year Development Plan. In 1962, he was appointed Financial Secretary and in 1967, Governor of the Bank of Jamaica.

Mr. Brown remained as Governor for ten years, before retiring in 1977. Following his retirement, he served briefly as Chairman of the International Bauxite Association before joining the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) as Deputy Administrator in 1978. Between 1984 and 1989 he served as Associate Administrator, UNDP. He returned as Governor of the Bank of Jamaica in 1989 and served in this capacity until 1992.

During his first tenure as Governor, Mr. Brown served as Chairman of Bank of Jamaica; Air Jamaica Ltd.; Students' Loan Council; Sugar Manufacturing Corporation of Jamaica; Jamaica Export Credit Insurance corporation; Priory School and as a director of National Hotels and Properties; Urban Development Corporation; Capital Development Fund; Jamaica Stock Exchange Council; Kingston Waterfront Development Ltd. and Frome Moneymusk Land Corporation. He served as Jamaica's Alternate Governor to the International Monetary Fund; World Bank; Inter-American Development Bank and the Caribbean Development Bank.

Mr. Brown also lectured part-time on finance and banking at the University of the West Indies and at Columbia University in New York. During his second stint as Governor, Mr. Brown was also chairman of the University Council, Mona Campus.

He died on 02 March 1993.

Headley Adolphus Brown who was Governor of the Bank of Jamaica from November 1985 to March 1989, was born on 12 November 1930 in St. Thomas, Jamaica. He graduated from the University of the West Indies with a B. Sc. in Economics in 1964; a Masters in Economics in 1965 and a Ph. D. in Economics in 1970.

Prior to becoming Governor of the Bank of Jamaica, Dr. Brown held various positions in the Jamaican government service, including Director General of the Planning Institute of Jamaica, 1981 to 1985 and Trade Administrator, 1977 to 1981. While serving as Governor, Dr. Brown was Chairman of the Board of the Bank and the National Export-Import Bank of Jamaica (EXIM Bank); and was a member of the Board of the Jamaica Pegasus Hotel and the National Investment Bank of Jamaica. He also served as Jamaica's Alternate Governor to the International Monetary Fund, World Bank, Caribbean Development Bank and the Inter-American Development Bank. On leaving the Bank of Jamaica, Dr. Brown went into private practice as a Financial Consultant. He died in 1995.

Horace Barber was appointed Governor of the Bank of Jamaica in January 1983 and served in this position until October 1985. He was born on 15 October 1922 and received his Bachelor of Arts degree from Cambridge University.

Mr. Barber worked in various positions with the Jamaican Government and became head of the Civil Service in 1973 when he was appointed Financial Secretary. He served in this capacity until 1982 when he became Governor.

While he was Financial Secretary, Mr. Barber served as Chairman of the Capital Development Fund; Jamaica International Telecommunications Ltd. (JAMINTEL) and the Commonwealth Telecommunications Council. He was also a member of the boards of Bank of Jamaica; Air Jamaica; National Development Bank and Jamaica Pegasus Hotel. When he became Governor, he served as chairman of the board of the Bank of Jamaica.

Herbert Samuel Walker, the fourth Governor of the Bank of Jamaica, was born in St. Mary, Jamaica on 29 February 1924. In 1942, he was awarded the Jamaica Centenary Scholarship and studied at McGill University in Canada, from which he graduated in 1946 with a B. A. (Economics and Political Science, first class honours). In 1948, he earned his LL.B. from Victoria University in Manchester, England and was called to the Bar at Gray's Inn, London in 1950.

Mr. Walker worked with the Development Secretariat in Guyana between 1950 and 1957 before returning to Jamaica. At home he worked with the Ministries of Trade and Industry; Tourism; and Finance until 1972 when he was appointed Jamaica's Permanent Representative to the United Nations Agencies in Geneva, with the rank of Ambassador. He returned to Jamaica in 1977 to assume the position of Governor of the Bank of Jamaica.

From 1981 to 1988, Mr. Walker served as Jamaica's High Commissioner to the United Kingdom and in 1989 he became the country's Ambassador to the United Nations, which position he held until 1993 when he retired from public service.

During his tenure in the Jamaican civil service and as Governor of the Bank of Jamaica, Mr. Walker served as Director on the boards of the Jamaica Industrial Development Corporation; Jamaica tourist board; Jamaica Development Bank; Hotel Corporation of Jamaica; River Rafting Authority and as Chairman of the Bank of Jamaica; Jamaica National Investment Company; Capital Development Fund and the Petroleum Corporation of Jamaica.

In 2000, he was awarded the Order of Jamaica. He now serves as Chairman of the Jamaica Deposit Insurance Corporation (JDIC).

G. Arthur Brown was the first Jamaican to be appointed Governor of the Bank of Jamaica. Born in St. Elizabeth, Jamaica on 25 July 1922, Mr. Brown began his career in the Jamaican civil service in 1941when he joined the staff of the Income Tax Department. He remained there until 1947 when he was awarded the Issa Scholarship to the London School of Economics from which he graduated in 1950 with a B. Sc. in Economics.

On his return to Jamaica, Mr. Brown worked briefly with the Income Tax Department before being assigned to the Colonial Secretary's Office in 1951 where he stayed until 1953 when he was appointed Principal Assistant Secretary in the |Ministry of Finance.

In 1957, Mr. Brown became the first Jamaican head of the Central Planning Unit and was responsible for drafting Jamaica's first Five Year Development Plan. In 1962, he was appointed Financial Secretary and in 1967, Governor of the Bank of Jamaica.

Mr. Brown remained as Governor for ten years, before retiring in 1977. Following his retirement, he served briefly as Chairman of the International Bauxite Association before joining the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) as Deputy Administrator in 1978. Between 1984 and 1989 he served as Associate Administrator, UNDP. He returned as Governor of the Bank of Jamaica in 1989 and served in this capacity until 1992.

During his first tenure as Governor, Mr. Brown served as Chairman of Bank of Jamaica; Air Jamaica Ltd.; Students' Loan Council; Sugar Manufacturing Corporation of Jamaica; Jamaica Export Credit Insurance corporation; Priory School and as a director of National Hotels and Properties; Urban Development Corporation; Capital Development Fund; Jamaica Stock Exchange Council; Kingston Waterfront Development Ltd. and Frome Moneymusk Land Corporation. He served as Jamaica's Alternate Governor to the International Monetary Fund; World Bank; Inter-American Development Bank and the Caribbean Development Bank.

Mr. Brown also lectured part-time on finance and banking at the University of the West Indies and at Columbia University in New York. During his second stint as Governor, Mr. Brown was also chairman of the University Council, Mona Campus.

He died on 02 March 1993.

Richard Thomas Ponsonby Hall, the second governor of the Bank of Jamaica, was born in England on 12 January 1927. He was educated at Tonbridge School in Kent, England, and graduated from King's College, Cambridge in 1951, with a degree in Modern Languages.

On graduation, Hall joined the Bank of England where he was assigned to the Cashier's Department before moving to the Overseas Department (West Europe and North American Affairs). Between 1955 and 1957, he was seconded to the Bank for International Settlements (BIS) where he worked in the Monetary and Economic Department. On his return to the Bank of England, he was again assigned to the Overseas Department and, in 1963, was seconded to the Bank of Jamaica as General Manager.

In December 1964, Hall acted as Governor and was confirmed in the position in April 1966.

Following his return to the Bank of England in 1967, he was appointed Assistant Chief, Overseas Office. He became an Advisor in 1971, but left the Bank in that year for the BIS, where he remained until his retirement in 1996.

Stanley W. Payton was appointed the first Governor of the Bank of Jamaica on 13 June 1960. He was previously an Advisor to the Bank of England and was nominated by that body for the post of Governor of the Bank of Jamaica on the request of the Government of Jamaica.

Mr. Payton had wide experience in the field of central banking and overseas matters, particularly in relation to the Commonwealth, the Middle East and Europe.

Between 1946 and 1947, Mr. Payton worked in various departments of the Bank of England. In 1948, he entered the Overseas Department and worked in the Commonwealth Affairs Unit until 1951

.In 1951, he assisted Sir Cecil Trevor in a survey of banking conditions and its needs in Ghana (then the Gold Coast). Between 1952 and 1953, he specialized in Middle Eastern Economic Affairs and travelled extensively in the countries of the Middle East. From 1954 to 1955, he assisted Lord Salter in Iraq and London in conducting a survey and outlining a plan of action for the development of Iraq.

In 1956 and 1957, Mr. Payton worked on a Cabinet Committee in London dealing with United Kingdom and Commonwealth relationships with the European Common Market and the establishment of the Free Trade Area. From 1958 until the time of his appointment in Jamaica, Mr. Payton represented the United Kingdom in Paris as the U.K's alternate on the Management of the European Monetary Agreement, and was responsible in the Bank of England for relations with all European International Organizations.

Mr. Payton served as Governor of the Bank of Jamaica until December 1964, at which time he returned to the Bank of England where he worked until his retirement.


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